Still afraid of THC????

THC is the most prominent cannabinoid in the cannabis plant. Most people think THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) is only used to get “high” and don’t bother to look at the medicinal effects. Back in the 1970’2-80’s the THC content of cannabis was much lower so it took more cannabis to “get high” but with the breeding going on now, the THC levels in cannabis strains are MUCH higher, so it doesn’t take much THC to get the results you want. Taken in low doses THC can have these medicinal effects:

  1. Sedating/Relaxing

  2. Reduces Pain

  3. Anti-tumor effect

  4. Anti-oxidant

  5. Reduces intraocular eye pressure

  6. Reduces nausea

  7. Stimulates appetite

  8. Anti-inflammatory

  9. Induces sleep

  10. Reduces anxiety/depression

  11. Gut issues

    Alot of people and especially seniors have some apprehension in trying THC because of the stigma and the fear of losing control. That is certainly something to think about but I have had alot of people try THC alone or in combination with CBD and have more effective results than just CBD alone. Obviously smoking or vaping THC when you are not used to it can create problems since you cannot regulate how much THC you are getting into your system and usually it too much! Then you have a negative experience and swear you will NEVER try it again! Sound familiar?

    And what are the negative effects of THC when you have too much? Here is a list of what some people might experience:

    1. Rapid heartbeat

    2. Lightheaded/dizzy

    3. Dry mouth/Red eyes

    4. Anxious/paranoid

    5. Hunger

    6. Sleepiness

      Cannabis is not fatal!!!! The above effects will wear off if you were ever to experience them. There are no cannabinoid receptors in the brain that control breathing and heart rate. This explains why there is no possibility of fatal overdose, unlike opioid drugs that can cause death!

      I myself have been in that situation before and it can create alot of fear but when taken in low doses can be very beneficial. How do you get low doses??? Tinctures are a great way to get consistent dosing. Everyone is different in regards to dosing…someone might only need 2 drops while others might need 15 drops for various conditions. So it is best to start of with a low dose, 2-3 drops and increase slowly until you get the desired results. Even cannabis doctors recommend this. This way you avoid the uncomfortable effects of too much THC! The only negative feedback that I have received was from a couple of people that got impatient and decided to take a dropperful instead of drops and had a not so great experience! Lesson learned.

      For instance, I had to find the right dose for myself for my sleep issues..I started with 2 drops and increased the drops over a period of 4 days to find that 6-8 drops of THC tincture works perfect for me without getting high or feeling groggy in the morning. So having some patience to find what is right for you will work in your favor.

      So with all that said, THC can be your friend for many health issues taken responsibly and taken in low doses. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions!

      To your health! Elizabeth@PiantaTinta

      piantatinta@protonmail.com

THC and CBD for Medical and Recreational Users: What Are the Differences?

Whether you are a recreational or a medicinal cannabis user, you must have asked yourself this question at least once: what’s the difference between THC or CBD and which ratio should I go for when buying marijuana?

Both of these substances have their own benefits on our body and mind, always complementing each other.

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Cannabidiol (CBD) are cannabinoids, the two most prevalent chemicals in marijuana and the ones responsible for its popularity. There are more than 100 cannabinoids found in our favorite herb, but these two have been studied the most for their medical benefits.

These chemicals have a very positive impact on the human body — a group of cellular receptors and transmitters forms our very own cannabinoid system, which is in turn responsible for regulating hundreds of different bodily processes, including pain regulation, appetite, mood and many more.

Today we’re checking out an infographic from Greencamp which provides all the information about these two cannabinoids you will ever need, as well as a quick THC:CBD ratio guide that you can use to make better smoking decisions. So, let’s take a look at all the differences between these two mind blowing cannabis chemicals.

Beginners Guide To 9 Major Cannabinoids

This article was written by Dr. Jessica Fox , May 31, 2016 and came from Green Flower Media.

Lots of good information!!  Please share with others..... Elizabeth, Pianta Tinta

Have you ever wondered how cannabis actually works in the body?

If you’ve read up on the endocannabinoid system, you’ll know that our bodies are full of receptors that interact with cannabinoids. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds that act directly and indirectly on cannabinoid receptors to help the body maintain stability and health.

Our bodies make their own cannabinoids – called endocannabinoids because they are produced internally – to work on cannabinoid receptors. By some happy coincidence of nature, cannabis and other plants also produce cannabinoids that interact with our receptors. These plant cannabinoids are known as phytocannabinoids.

Phytocannabinoids are just one of the cannabis plant’s active ingredients. Other plant compounds known as terpenes and flavonoids also direct how cannabis will work for you.

But the phytocannabinoids are the cornerstone of your medicine’s effect.

What do you need to know about phytocannabinoids?

There are over 85 known phytocannabinoids – some sources put the count well over 100! Here, we will tour the nine phytocannabinoids that have been most thoroughly documented, starting with the two most prominent compounds: THC and CBD.

The ins and outs of THC

Newcomers to cannabis are finding a lot of guidance through knowledgeable physicians.

THC is famous for its psychoactive effects and while those cognitive effects can have a variety of advantages or disadvantages depending on the situation, THC offers additional health properties that should not be overlooked.

THC is particularly valuable for managing pain and reducing inflammation, the compound directly addressing the underlying drivers of chronic pain and inflammatory disorders. THC also has great effect in reducing nausea and vomiting, and on the flip side of that coin, stimulating appetite.

Other common uses for THC include aiding sleep, managing glaucoma, reducing muscle spasms, and protecting the nervous system. The nervous system protection has made THC a useful tool in helping to manage autism, ADHD, and post-stroke symptoms.

THC does have some side effects to be aware of – especially if you take too much.

The most common side effects of THC include rapid heart rate, anxiety and paranoia, sleepiness, increased appetite, dry mouth and dry eyes, forgetfulness, dizziness, reduced blood pressure, and potentially hallucinations if you take a lot. For the most part, side effects resolve when the medicine wears off and are generally considered benign.

Getting your THC dosage just right can help you get the most benefit from your medicine while avoiding unwanted side effects, which typically arise when a patient has dosed over their tolerance. The side effect profile of THC is why cannabis doctors counsel their patients to start with a very low dose – around 2.5 – 5 mg of THC, and to gradually increase the dose according to how well they tolerate it.

Finally, you may have noticed that some of the uses for THC are the same as some of the side effects! This is because cannabis is the ultimate personalized medicine. A negative side effect for one person may be a positive side effect for another. A classic example is a patient with cancer regaining his appetite after medicating – what a blessing for him! Similarly, an insomniac will be deeply grateful for THC’s ability to cause sleepiness after an exhausting day.

CBD – the “new kid” on the block

CBD has changed how a lot of people view cannabis and for good reason.

While it has been around just as long as THC, CBD has only in the past few years become very popular in the medical cannabis world due to its effectiveness against epilepsy and cancer without the head high effects of THC. Though some would argue the claim that CBD is not psychoactive because it promotes relaxation and anxiety relief, it is generally accepted that CBD does not cause the euphoric high that THC does.

In addition to reducing or eliminating seizures and fighting the growth of tumor and cancer cells, CBD is an excellent treatment for anxiety. CBD is also an antipsychotic agent, which is why cannabis can actually be a useful tool in managing mental illness, contrary to mainstream belief.

Other popular uses for CBD include reducing muscle spasms and spasms of the small intestine, and application as a pain reduction and anti-inflammatory agent. Finally, even more so than THC, CBD protects the nervous system, making it a great tool for managing dementia and Parkinson’s disease, and essential for use with THC in autism and post-stroke care.

While typically much better tolerated than THC, CBD can have side effects of its own at very high doses, such as dizziness or lightheadedness, anxiety, decreased appetite, drowsiness, increased heart rate and palpitations, and jitteriness.

A really amazing fact about CBD is that it actually reduces undesirable effects of THC, such as inebriation, sedation, and racing heart. Specifically, in medicines with phytocannabinoid content of 4 parts or more CBD to 1 part THC (a 4:1 CBD:THC ratio or higher), CBD will dampen the head high and side effects caused by THC.

Not only that, but CBD can enhance the pain-relieving, nausea-reducing, and anti-cancer effects of THC (yes – THC is quite active against cancer cells too!).

Bottom line – your medicine is better when it contains both THC and CBD!

You said there were 9 major phytocannabinoids…

Though THC and CBD are the most well known phytocannabinoids, we continue to learn more about the characteristics and applications of the other seven.

#1) THCA is the acidic parent of THC found in the raw cannabis plant. When exposed to heat, sunlight, or time, the THCA in the harvested plant will convert to THC. THCA is non-psychoactive and is particularly useful for reducing nausea, reducing seizures, reducing muscle spasms, and fighting tumor and cancer cells.

#2) CBDA is the acidic parent of CBD found in raw plant. CBDA converts to CBD when it is exposed to heat, sunlight, or time. Like THCA, CBDA is non-psychoactive. CBDA is also great for reducing nausea, reducing inflammation, and fighting tumor and cancer cells.

#3) CBN is a breakdown product of THC. As harvested cannabis ages, THC will gradually be converted to CBN. CBN is known to be particularly useful for aiding sleep, and also good for reducing pain and muscle spasms.

#4) CBGA is actually the precursor molecule that is turned into THCA and CBDA as the cannabis plant develops, so it is found only in tiny amounts in the mature plant. In the harvested plant, remaining CBGA converts to CBG with exposure to air and light.

#5) CBG is useful as an antidepressant, a muscle relaxant, an antibiotic and antifungal agent, and as a blood pressure reducer.

#6) CBC is also found only in tiny amounts in the cannabis plant. CBC has pain reducing, anti-inflammatory, antibiotic, antifungal, and anti-cancer effects.

#7) THCV does have psychoactive properties, but much less than THC. THCV has been found to suppress appetite and can aid weight loss, and also has antiseizure effect.

Which phytocannabinoids are right for you?

An experienced physician can guide patients to getting the most out of cannabis.

Your goal should be to tailor the phytocannabinoid content of your medicine to the conditions and symptoms you want to treat. As noted before, cannabis is a very personal medication, with every person requiring a different medicine composition for even the same condition. As such, there is often much trial and error that goes into finding your ideal phytocannabinoid content.

You can use the details outlined above to help get you started in finding the best composition for your medicine, and here are some examples of the phytocannabinoids that may be useful for the most common conditions seen in many cannabis clinics:

Chronic pain: There are several different forms of chronic pain. Nerve pain may be best managed with CBD and THCA. Muscular pain often responds well to THC. A combination of THC and CBD can be useful for bone pain. Inflammatory pain can be managed with THCA or THC. Skeletal and internal muscle spasms can be relieved with CBD.

Insomnia: THC and its breakdown product, CBN, are particularly useful for aiding sleep. And spoiler alert for the follow-up article on terpenes and flavonoids: the terpene called Myrcene is a great tool for improving sleep!

Anxiety: CBD is the best remedy for anxiety, but at high doses can actually increase anxiety. THC can also be useful for anxiety, but only at low doses. Again, whether you’re using high CBD or high THC medicine, you should always start at a low dose and increase only gradually as needed to achieve the relief you’re seeking.

Counteracting a too intense high....

Recently saw an article about 8 ways to counteract a too intense cannabis high, at Leafly.com

What surprised me was that Cannabidiol (CBD) was not even on the list. Cannabidiol counteracts any negative psychoactive effects of THC. For those of you who have never experienced this, some of the effects of taking too much THC can be rapid heartbeat, drowsiness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, increase or decrease in blood pressure, anxiety and paranoia...these can be very uncomfortable but fear not, there have been zero reported cannabis overdose deaths in the history of the plant. So remember no matter how freaked out you feel...you will be fine!!

Here is the list of 8 ways to counteract the uncomfortable effects according to Leafly.com:

1. Don't panic - the effects can last minutes to sometimes hours, but know that it will wear off, give it some time and the feelings will pass.

2. Know your Limits: don't feel pressured to consume more than you think you can handle, take it slow, especially if you are going to consume edibles. A standard dose of edibles is 10mg but I would start at 5mg and ease into it. You can always increase once you know how your body handles it. This goes for inhalation also.

3. Keep hydrated: This will help with the "dry mouth" feeling....do stay away from alcohol as it can increase THC blood concentrations.

4. Keep Black Pepper on hand: cannabis and pepper have very similar chemical traits; pepper has a “phytocannabinoid-terpenoid effect,” which is known to help with pain, depression, addiction, and anxiety. Combining the terpenoids (such as beta-caryophyllene) in pepper with the tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis has a synergistic chemical reaction on the cannabinoid receptors in the brain. In layman’s terms, they both bind to the same receptors in the brain and, when combined, have a therapeutic, calming effect.

5. Keep calm and rest: Concentrate on your breathing and the sound of your breath. Sometimes sleeping it off can work, but it might be hard if you can't turn your brain off, but if you feel sleepy, then sleep!

6. Try going for a walk: If you can't turn your brain off, then try going for a walk, stick close to home of course, sometimes fresh air and distraction works. If you feel light headed, then its best not to walk.

7. Take a shower or bath:  If you are at home, try this to help you relax.

8. Distract yourself: listen to music, play a video game, talk to a friend, something that gives you positive feelings (like eating ice cream!)

So, some good tips, but my favorites are:

CBD: a cannabinoid that naturally counteracts the psychoactive effects of too much THC. I personally experienced taking too much THC oil and found myself pacing the living room with a increased heart rate, and a little bit of paranoia. Knowing that I would be alright I took a dropperful (about 20mg) of CBD tincture and within 3 minutes my heart rate started slowing, and within 5 minutes I was back in bed. Had I not taken the CBD, the uncomfortable feeling could have lasted 30-690 minutes. Keep some CBD on hand!!

Black Pepper: keep some peppercorns on hand and crunch on a few! Combining the terpenoids (such as beta caryophyllene and pinene ) in pepper with the tetrahydrocannabinol in cannabis has a synergistic chemical reaction on the cannabinoid receptors in the brain. In layman’s terms, they both bind to the same receptors in the brain and, when combined, have a therapeutic, calming effect.

Lemon peel- contains the terpene called limonene, which works on anxiety and calms.

Source: https://www.leafly.com/news/cannabis-101/8...

What is RSO OIl????

Since the world of cannabis medicine is new to ALOT of people, I realized that people usually know what a tincture is, but might not know what RSO oil is. Since we have it available on our website I wanted to talk a bit about it so that you might be educated and empowered!

"RSO" stands for Rick Simpson Oil. For those of you who do not know who this man is here is a link to his website Phoenix Tears. He explains how to make your own medicinal cannabis oil. He does not supply the oil!!  You can check out his website to see how it is produced but in short it is a cold extraction using a solvent (there are a number to choose from but I feel the most safe is pure non-denatured ethanol.) to extract the cannabinoids and other plant compounds out, then under low heat cook off the solvent and what you have left is about 60 grams of a thick resinous oil that is the concentrated oil that contains cannabinoids, terpenes, flavinoids and other beneficial components of the cannabis plant. If you are interested in the Rick Simpson story here is a link to purchase his book.

RSO oil is beneficial for those that have gone through chemo, radiation and have problems keeping weight on. Cannabis has been proven to relieve and mitigate chronic pains, as well as helping with migraines, nausea, cramps, arthritis, diabetes, IBS, Crohns, MS, Lupus, Alzheimers, Parkinsons, Autism and high blood pressure, among many other issues. Dr. Christina Sanchez has done many studies on how THC kills cancer cells. Have sleeping problems?? Many people do these days and THC oil promotes healthy and restful sleep!
Topical skin conditions, rashes and sores have all shown improved signs of healing when treated with Cannabis oil lotions.

Since it is high THC, you must be very careful and start off with a very small dose, the size of 1/2 grain of rice.....pretty small huh??  Here is a video explaining the dosing that he recommends....for people with serious issues ie: cancer, there is a 60-90 day protocol he recommends....

The endocannabinoid system in our bodies regulate our cancer defense -- so it makes sense that cannabis works effectively in this area, and the science backs that up.

Many people cannot or will not make their own RSO oil, so we are lucky to have a local man make this important medicine!!  Fully decarboxylated and solvent free. It is lab tested for molds and cannabinoid ratios. Since this can have some psychoactive effects in large doses, it is best used at night about an hour before bed. If you take it orally, it has to be broken down by your digestive system and liver, so this takes a little time. A word of caution....it is always best to start slow to see how your body responds, it you start off with a large dose to quickly you can experience some uncomfortable effects like: extreme drowsiness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, lack of focus, rapid heartbeat, feelings of euphoria or paranoia...These effects are not life threatening, just uncomfortable.....soooooo give it the respect is deserves and start at the lowest dose possible!!

One other tip to keep in mind, if you ever have uncomfortable effects from THC, always keep some High CBD tincture on hand, it naturally counteracts the effects of the THC. So hopefully this gives you a better idea of what it is...if there is still some questions that have not been answered, there are many sites online to find them or drop me a line!

Best of Health

Elizabeth,  Pianta Tinta

 

Medicinal marijuana is now healing pets too!

Pets benefit from cannabis too! Here is a article from Natural News

Friday, May 08, 2015 by: L.J. Devon, Staff Writer


National re-legalization of marijuana is closer than it's ever been. The majority of Americans are starting to realize that cannabis is NOT an addictive, immoral and destructive drug. Americans are starting to see cannabis for what it truly is -- a harmless, useful plant with several healing virtues. Among the virtues being rediscovered is cannabis's ability to cure chronic issues in dogs.

The more states legalize the plant for medicinal purposes, the more we see businesses springing up to help both people and pets get well.

It's important to understand that marijuana's potential for abuse is not much different from that of OTC pain meds, soda or television, which are all legal. Actually, marijuana is practically safer than all three. Eating too much pain pills can wipe out one's liver. Drinking too much soda can make one an obese, type II diabetic, and watching too much television can send people into states of lazy hypnosis that convince them via advertisement to buy into a long list of fast foods and pharmaceutical drugs.

Marijuana is not all about getting "high" either. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is psychoactive but is just one part of the Cannabis sativa plant. While some relax to THC's psychoactive quality, others are using another part of the plant -- cannabidiol (CBD) -- to heal seizures, pain and cancer. Interestingly, medical marijuana dispensaries are now using CBD compounds to help dogs with their chronic issues.
 

15-year-old Labrador mix experiences near instant relief from CBD treats

A woman named Wendy Mansfield, of Fort Bragg, California has been trying everything she can to help her 15-year-old Labrador mix named Kali.

Kali had been showing signs of chronic pain and was scheduled to be euthanized. The day before her dog was scheduled to be euthanized, Wendy decided to try one last option. Thankfully, this option was available in her state. She took her ailing dog to a marijuana dispensary designed specifically for sick dogs.

Kali showed signs of chronic pain and lethargy. She groaned and licked her paws often. This was accompanied by fits of coughing. After giving Kali a medicinal marijuana treat, nothing much happened until 20 minutes later. Suddenly, the licking stopped.

Impressed, Wendy gave Kali a second and third CBD treat. The cannabidiol was bringing Kali back to life. Kali came out of her depressed state, stood up and fetched her own water outside. It was extraordinary progress in a short amount of time! Many of the obvious signs of pain, like groaning, quickly subsided as well.

At this point, Wendy cancelled her appointment to put down her dog. Three weeks later, Wendy told Quartz, "Never in my wildest dreams would I have anticipated this. It brought my dog back."
 

Plant medicine is re-emerging

The more medical professionals embrace cannabinoids, the more they'll realize that true biological healing comes from plants, not synthetic formulations. Imagine medicine returning to its roots and actually healing people without long lists of heinous side effects! For example, one day the active ingredient in turmeric root, curcumin, will be heralded as mainstream medicine for healing systemic inflammation which is at the root of many diseases today. Imagine the essential oil of lavender being used in place of psychotic drugs to alleviate depression. Imagine there being no more deadly side effects like suicidal thoughts that depression medications often illicit.

Today's "alternative medicine" is slowly reclaiming its position as real medicine. Synthetic formulations will surely fade into the bowels of history, as the collective consciousness wakes up to the lies that have been perpetuated and marketed over and over again.

The US federal government still classifies marijuana as a Schedule I substance and defines it as a drug "with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse." That myth is beginning to shatter.

Pets being healed with cannabis treats are another example of truth coming to light, shattering the current paradigm that says marijuana is evil and those who use it should be jailed.

The war on medicinal plants must end.

Sources:

http://qz.com


 

Source: http://www.naturalnews.com/049633_medical_...

Misconceptions of CBD (Cannabidiol)

Cannabis contains several hundred compounds, including various flavonoids, aromatic terpenes, and many minor cannabinoids in addition to THC and CBD. Each of these compounds has specific healing attributes, but when combined they create what scientists refer to as a holistic “entourage effect,” so that the therapeutic impact of the whole plant is greater than the sum of its single-molecule parts. The Food and Drug Administration, however, isn’t in the business of approving plants as medicine.

Read More

Mercola interviews Dr. Frankel on Medical Cannabis

I am posting this excellent article and video by Dr. Mercola that is from March 9th, 2014. If you are confused about what is medicine and what isn't, or cannabis versus hemp, strength and dosage, then please read on and take some time to watch the interview!! A big thank you to Dr. Joseph Mercola and the wonderful service he provides for those of us that choose holistic health care.....

Elizabeth

By Dr. Mercola

Marijuana has been legalized in a number of US states; 20 states have legalized cannabis for medical purposes; two states—Colorado and Washington state—also permit recreational use. Certain forms of cannabis are actually very potent medicine, with few or no psychoactive effects.

In California, medical marijuana has been legal for 18 years. Dr. Allan Frankel, a board-certified internist in California, has treated patients with medical cannabis for the past seven years.

By and large, cannabis is highly favored by people across the US. According to Dr. Frankel, 85-95 percent of Americans are in favor of medical cannabis, and 58-59 percent are in favor of legalizing marijuana.

The federal government, meanwhile, wants to get rid of all medical use of marijuana, which of course begs the question: Why? According to Dr. Frankel, the answer is simple. "They want it. This is a huge market," he says.

And yes, medical cannabis is clearly competition to the pharmaceutical industry, as the cannabis plant can take the place of a wide variety of synthetic drugs, especially for mood and anxiety disorders. The last thing they want is a therapy that's going to take away from their bottom line.

Cannabis as Medicine

Dr. Frankel initially learned about medical cannabis through glaucoma trials and cancer work performed at UCLA in the 70s and early 80s.

"I've always seen it as a medicine," he says. "Eventually, I got interested in it. I thought my tool box was getting too small for typical issues with patients related to anxiety, pain, or the common issues where we just had inadequate medications.

I saw the cannabinoid future was something that was bright. Seven years ago, I kind of picked up my formal white coat and sprayed a little green on it..."

Green Bridge Medical is his professional corporation where he sees patients, performs research, and provides physician and patient education and outreach. For all its benefits, using cannabis in lieu of other medicines has many challenges.

"It's a complicated process, as a physician in particular, working inside the medical system, to work outside the medical system to make these dose-consistent extracts available."

Many may find the idea of medical cannabis abhorrent or somehow "wrong," as we've been indoctrinated to view marijuana as a dangerous gateway drug that will lead you down a path of illicit drug use.

Many fail to realize that prescription drugs actually have FAR greater potential to turn you into "a junkie." Legal drug addiction is also taking lives in record numbers. In the UK, one million people are addicted to over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription painkillers and tranquilizers.

That's significantly more than the number addicted to illegal drugs.1 In the US, there were four times more deaths among women from prescription painkiller overdose than for cocaine and heroin deaths combined in 2010.2

Pharmaceuticals in general are among the leading causes of death in the US, and some medicines have killed tens of thousands of individuals. The painkiller Vioxx is one classic example, which killed over 60,000 before being pulled off the market.

The diabetes drug Avandia is another, and most recently, a study estimated that in a five-year span, some 800,000 people in Europe were killed from inappropriate use of beta-blockers in non-cardiac surgery patients. Deaths attributed to cannabis barely registers in comparison.

"I think that any intervention, regardless of how benign (I would say in my 35 years of medical experience, cannabis should be considered a benign substance overall), there are potential uses and abuses," Dr. Frankel says.

"For me, we're just talking about the real solid indications. The issue of abuse and neglect is there, but I think it's relatively small. I think the claim that it is a gateway drug has been pretty soundly proven not to be correct.

Even if cannabis to some extent is a gateway drug (which I do not believe it is), even if it is, it should be legalized to protect the gateway [drug] issue, because legalization opens up communication."

Natural health physician and Mercola.com founder Dr. Joseph Mercola interviews Dr. Allan Frankel about the medical uses of marijuana or cannabis.

What's the Difference Between Medical and Non-Medical Marijuana?

According to Dr. Frankel, cannabis has been cultivated in Northern Europe since before the last Ice Age. Even back then, there were two very distinct groups of strains. One is cannabis; the other is hemp. There's plenty of confusion about the similarities and differences between these two plants. While they are subspecies of the same plant species, they look very different, and are extremely different in ways that really matter when it comes to medicinal use.

The thing they have in common is that they both contain cannabidiol (CBD), which has medicinal properties. The amount of CBD however, differs greatly between the two. Dosing, therefore, is dramatically different where you to try to use hemp in lieu of cannabis, as the latter, cannabis, is up to 100-fold more potent. Another difference that appears to matter in terms of its usefulness as medicine relates to differing terpene profiles. Hemp contains very little of these valuable medicinal compounds.

Lastly, there's the tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content. THC is the psychoactive component of marijuana; it's the molecule that makes you feel "stoned." (While cannabidiol (CBD) also has certain psychoactive properties, it does NOT produce a high.) By legal definition, hemp cannot have more than 0.3 percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in it. So to summarize:

  • Hemp has less value for medicinal uses, as it only contains about four percent CBD and lacks many of the medicinal terpenes and flavonoids. It also contains less than 0.3 percent THC, which means it cannot produce a high or get you stoned. However, for many disease processes, THC is very much indicated and required. So, for many disease processes, CBD alone has much less value.
  • Cannabis is potent medicine courtesy of high amounts (about 10-20 percent) of CBD, critical levels of medicinal terpenes, and flavanoids, as well as THC in varying ratios for various diseases. The higher the THC, the more pronounced its psychoactive effects

How Marijuana Got a Bad Rap

"What happened in the '60s and '70s was that due to desires for psychedelia, the changes in the war in Vietnam, and the war on drugs with Nixon, the types of strains that were available and the demand for psychedelia changed. Before we knew it, CBD—due to a lack of 'stoniness'—was bred out of the plant," Dr. Frankel explains.

As a result of growers breeding out the all-important CBD, marijuana became known primarily as a plant that gets you high. Its original medicinal properties and uses largely fell by the wayside. Things are changing however.

"Five years ago, California Physicians, and other groups around the world, didn't really know if we would find CBD-rich strains anymore, but we have. Now there's many different varieties of it. We keep bringing back new CBD rich strains every month or two. These plants genes' haven't seen the light of day for God knows how long."

CBD is currently a Schedule 1 controlled substance, which means:

  • The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse
  • The drug or other substance has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the US
  • There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision

There's no doubt that CBD needs to be rescheduled, as each of these three points are blatantly wrong. Dr. Frankel actually thinks cannabis should be de-scheduled altogether, as a plant really does not belong on any schedule of a controlled substance.

"How could we have a plant on a schedule? What if it's an all-THC plant? What if it's an all-CBD? What if we find some other psychoactivity? If you take the Physicians' Desk Reference (PDR) and look at every product, none of them looks like a plant to me. This is the only plant, and it's not just one medicine. One entry with one data ID or MDI cannot be applied for cannabis. For example, we're actually right now making different medicines with cannabis plants based upon harvest time.

As the plants mature, the flowers get darker and darker. There's a traditional time when you're just supposed to pick them. Of course, what we've done is we picked them at different times in large amounts, ground them all together so we can get very representative samples, and see what happens in the last few weeks of flowering. The medicine changes a lot in the last three weeks. You can make more sedating medicine by letting it just stay on the vine three weeks longer. Even how long you let it grow makes it a very different medicine, a noticeably different medicine," he says.

Who's a Good Candidate for Medical Cannabis?

In his medical practice, Dr. Frankel treats a wide variety of patients with medical cannabis, which has become his specialty. Despite the many claims of cannabis performing miracles, he's reluctant to think of it as a cure for anything. Occasionally, however, patients will experience very dramatic results. For example, he has seen tumors virtually disappear in some patients using no other therapy except taking 40 to 60 milligrams of cannabinoids a day. The most common thing he sees in cancer patients, however, are tumors shrinking, or a metastasis disappearing. Sometimes tumors will shrink or vanish, only to reemerge in other areas, months later, and then shrink or vanish again... Other common ailments being treated with cannabis include:

  • Mood disorders
  • Pain disorders
  • Degenerative neurological disorders such as dystonia
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson's disease
  • PTSD
  • Seizure Disorders

He recounts how two dystonia patients with severe myofascial spasms were able to return to normal life after taking two milligrams of whole-plant CBD three times a day for a little more than one week. This is quite astounding, considering each of them had spent more than a decade undergoing neurosurgeries and taking multiple medications.

Dr. Frankel is very focused on trying to develop accurate dose-consistent medicine. The Patient Access Centers he consults with create a diverse collection of dose-consistent oral-buccal sprays. He also believes it's very important to open up and start talking about dosing—what works, what doesn't. It is his belief that some patients, in large part due to lack of education about the medicine, may be taking 10, or even 100 times higher dosage than is really needed to treat their ailment. Unfortunately, many doctors in this still highly controversial field are afraid to recommend dosages, for fear of the repercussions.

"There's this false notion (I think I can very safely say it's false) that doctors cannot recommend dosage because of this federal [law against] aiding and abetting with cannabis. It's not true. It's just not true," he says. "There are no [cannabis] medications that we dose by body weight. We now have about 120 kids with seizure disorder, and if you look at the surveys, across the board, the average dose is 37 milligrams [of whole-plant CBD] per day, and there's no relationship with body size."

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A British pharmaceutical company called GW Pharmaceuticals has a cannabis product that is distributed in Canada and five other countries. It's a 1:1 CBD-THC whole plant extract. "It's a very good medicine," Dr. Frankel says. "But it's expensive. That's the problem with pharmaceutical [companies]." Dr. Frankel also consults with various states that are interested in growing medicinal CBD, i.e. cannabis with a high CBD content and hemp-level (extremely low) THC. He even gives the CBD seeds away. "I make the offer: if any governor in the 50 states wants, absolutely free – as long as I can do it legally – any of these high-ratio CBD strains, I can make it happen. No cost," he says.

"This is one of the important points I'd to emphasize: I think we're going to find ultimately that CBD is a nutritional supplement for everybody. I think we were all using [cannabis] 100 years ago... I think then, if they had hemp for food, there was CBD in it. Again, I wasn't there, but my guess is that everybody had CBD in their diet up until 100 years ago or so. CBD appears in some of the newest data to help protect your DNA epigenetic layer. That's important stuff for all of the toxins that we have in our environment. I think we have more toxins now, and we're missing one of the major protectants that we used to use for this. That's a double whammy."

Source: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles...

5 Differences between THC and CBD

The following is an article from 420 Insight. For people not familiar with the different components of cannabis or think cannabis is all about the "high" please read on. The comment I have is about sleep. We have many members that use CBD for sleep. From the feedback we get, lower doses of CBD can help with sleep issues while higher doses can boost energy it's all about paying attention to how it works in YOUR BODY!!

Cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are the two main ingredients in the marijuana pelant. Both CBD and THC belong to a unique class of compounds known as cannabinoids.

While many strains of marijuana are known for having abundant levels of THC, high-CBD strains are less common. But CBD has recently started to draw attention from the medical community, who seem to prefer CBD over THC. Here, we explain the differences between these two compounds.

1) THE HIGH

THC is probably best known for being the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana. CBD, however, is non-psychoactive. In other words, CBD can’t get you high. While disappointing to recreational users, this unique feature of CBD is what makes it so appealing as a medicine.

Doctors usually prefer treatments with minimal side effects, which has been a major barrier to the acceptance of medical marijuana. Likewise, CBD has been used to treat younger children with various ailments.
 

2) ANXIETY


THC is known to cause some people to feel anxious or paranoid. But CBD is believed to have the opposite effect. In fact, studies show that CBD works to counteract the anxiety caused by ingesting THC. A number of studies also suggest that CBD can reduce anxiety when administered on its own.
 

3) ANTIPSYCHOTIC


In addition to being non-psychoactive, CBD seems to have antipsychotic properties. Researchers believe that CBD may protect marijuana users from getting too high by reducing the psychosis-like effects of THC. However, regulating the mind-altering activity of THC isn’t all that CBD is good for. On its own, CBD is being tested as an antipsychotic medicine for people with schizophrenia.
 

4) SLEEP


One of the most common uses of marijuana is as a sleep aid. THC is believed to be responsible for most of marijuana’s sleep-inducing effects. On the other hand, studies suggest CBD acts to promote wakefulness, making CBD a poor choice as a sleep medicine. The opposite effects of CBD and THC on sleep may explain why some strains of cannabis cause users to feel drowsy while others are known to boost energy.
 

5) LEGAL STATUS


While most countries have strict laws surrounding marijuana and THC, the legal status of CBD is less clear. In the United States, CBD is technically illegalsince it is classified as a Schedule I drug under federal law. A pharmaceutical form of CBD, called Epidiolex, was only recently cleared by the FDA to be tested in children with severe epilepsy.

On the other hand, CBD is found in hemp, which can be legally imported and sold in the U.S. Some companies have taken advantage of this loophole by importing high-CBD hemp extracts from other countries where hemp is produced.